IRELAND OLD NEWS



THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1909
TUAM, CO. GALWAY


PITHY PARS. - Personal, Parochial Provincial and Particular

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Edward Martyn was born at Masonbrook, near Loughrea, in this county, on the
31st January, 1859.  He was educated at Belvedere, College, Dublin; Beaumont
College, Windsor, and Christ Church, Oxford; but his only real education was
that which he gave himself.  In 1885 he thought of publishing a volume of poems,
but destroyed them instead.  In 1890 he published a satirical romance called
"Morgante the Lesser."  In 1899 his two plays, "The Heather Field" and "Maeve,"
with an introduction by George Moore, appeared, and immediately gave rise to
a storm of controversy in the Press.  "The Heather Field," at the inaguration
of the Irish Literary Theatre, was produced on the stage in Dublin with
brilliant artistic success in May, 1899, and in London at Terry's Theatre. With the
same success, inn the following June.  It has since been translated into
German for the German stage.  It was produced for the first time three nights last
week at the Abbey National Theatre, Dublin, by the talented troupe that have
made that place famous, and with the same success that marked the previous
performances.

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In the Co Galway Land Purchase has thus proceeded: Area purchased and
distributed, 53,332s. 1 r. 24 p.; area purchased but not yet distributed, 34s. 3r
30p.; area for which offers had been made but which had not been acquired,
22,069s. 2r. 18p.

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In the Ballinasloe Lunatic Asylum the number on last Board day, 487 males,
544 males - 1,03, since admitted, 14 males, 7 females - 21; since discharged, 2
males, 4 females - 6; died, 8 males, 6 females - 14; remaining on this date,
851 males, 545 females - 1,894.  County Galway, 563 males, 336 females - 899;
County Roscommon, 269 males, 205 females - 474; original lunatics, 12 males, 2
females - 14; total, 851 males, 448 females.

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A large consignment of Persse's whiskey was shipped by the s. s. Arethusa for
Newry Custom House during the present week.  The quantity of whiskey was the
largest which left Galway port for a considerable period, amounting to over
200 puncheons.

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Sir George and Lady Morris, who have been staying at Mentone for the last six
weeks, have gone onto Seville for a short stay, after which they will return
home.

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Owing to the decision arrived at by the Mayo County Council on Saturday last,
the Secretary.  Mr. John Clarke, the Accountant, Mr. George B. Virtue, and
Mr. James Sweeney, writing clerk, will hand in their resignations at the next
meeting of the Council.

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The Most Rev. Dr. Healy, Archbishop of Tuam, in the course of an address at
Balle parish church, after a reference to temperance in connection with which
his Grace stated that he was delighted to hear from Father MacDermott that
there was a great improvement, said he was pleased to hear that after long
negotiations the large estate and the grass lands around the town - and nowhere were
they more remarkable in Ireland, than about Balla - had been purchased, and
would be divided amongst the people for cultivation..  It had always been a
great satisfaction to him to hear of things moving in that direction, and he was
glad that the day would soon be at hand when, instead of the land being given
over to cattle, the people would have it to work it, and in this connection his
Grace urged that they should work the land properly by applying labour and
skill to it, and if they did the produce would be five times more per acre than
at present, and he advocated that farmers ought to produce everything needed
for the support of their families from the land.

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The late gifted and popular writer, Marion Crawford, was connected on his
father's side with the Crawford's of Galway.  Francis Marion Crawford, the
celebrated novelist, died on April 2.  He was born August 2, 1854, at the Baths of
Lucca, in Northern Italy.  He derived his given names from a maternal ancestor,
General Francis Marion, a heroic figure in the American Revolution.  His
father, Thomas Crawford, was the son of emigrants from the West of Ireland, who was
brought to America when a child, was apprenticed in boyhood to a wood carver
and in early manhood went to Rome to study carving in marble.  With W W Story
and Hiram Powers he eventually became a member of the famous trio of pioneer
American sculptors who made their headquarters in Italy, the two former in
Rome, the latter in Florence.  Thomas Crawford married Miss Louisa Ward, a sister
of Mrs. Ward Howe.  At two years of age Marion was sent to be brought up by
relatives in Bordentown, NJ, but after his father's death, in 1857, he was taken
back to Rome, where he spent his boyhood.  Until twelve years of age his
education was entrusted to a French governess, so that he was brought up with
three languages, the French of his nursery, the Italian of his environment and the
English of his family circle.

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We are very pleased to learn that the recent examination for clerkships for
the G P O London, Master T P O'Regan, son of Mr. James O'Regan, postmaster,
Kiltimagh, passed a very successful examination, having qualified, and obtained
8th place from 300 applicants.  We join in wishing him very many happy years to
enjoy his position, and hope that this is only the forerunner to higher
honours in the service of this great Department.

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We are pleased to learn that Lord Lucan who for some time past has been
indisposed, has now completely recovered from his illness.  This will be pleasing
news to the people of Castlebar, where his lordship is so much esteemed, as
well as to all the tenants on the Lucan Estate.  Few as to all the tenants on the
Lucan Estate.  Few Irish landlords have proved so worthy of the admiration of
the people as the present Earl of Lucan, who not only made generous
presentation in the way of free sites the church, schools, parochial residence,
presbytery, and other building sites in Castlebar, who is also noted for his
charitable treatment of his tenantry, and was one of the first, if not the first,
landlord in Ireland that striped out his large farms and divided them amongst his
tenants.  Lord Lucan has set a noble example which might well be followed by
landlords throughout Ireland. We are pleased to learn that he will, as usual,
spend the summer months as Castlebar House.

THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, MAY 8, 1909
TUAM, CO GALWAY


TUAM BILLARD CLUB, THE LATE MR. FRANCIS MEAGHER, T.C.

At a special meeting of the committee of the above, held on Tuesday, the 4th
inst., Mr. John Connelly (Vice President) in the chair ; also present -
Messrs. P. Canavan (Treas.) ; M. Nolan, C. G. Blake, D. H. Burke, P. Byrne, F. B.
McDonogh, E. Quinn, James Daly, John Murphy, M. J. Mannion (Secretary), the
following resolution proposed by Mr. Canavan was unanimously adopted : -

"That we, the members of the Tuam Billard Club, have heard with profound
regret of the death of the late Mr. Francis Meagher, T.C., who was for many years
President of our club, and who by his kindly and courteous manner endeared
himself to all the members.  That we desire to tender our sincere sympathy to his
wife and family in their sad affliction, and that as a mark of our respect to
his memory our club be closed until the day after the interment of his
remains."

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BIRTH

KEANE - May 5, 1909, the wife of Mr. Francis Keane, T.C., Merchant, of a
daughter.

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DIED

FLATLEY - May 5, 1909  at his residence, The Square, Kinvara, William
Flatley, sen,; deeply regretted by his loving family and large circle of friends.

DONNELLAN - On April 28th, 1909, Mary, relict of the late Patrick Donnellan,
carpentar and builder, Tuam.  Funeral took place on Friday 30th, to the New
Cemetery. - R.I.P. American papers please copy.

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Athenry Fair held on 5th May was an average sized fair ; demand brisk for all
cattle in moderate condition and a good clearance effected.

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MARRIAGE

MURPHY AND McGOVAN

A quiet wedding took place at Tuam R.C. Cathedral on Thursday, 29th ult, Very
Rev. T. F. Canon Macken, Adm, officiating, when Mr. Patrick Murphy, Galway
Road, Tuam, was joined in wedlock to Katie, youngest daughter of Mr. Thomas
McGough, of same road.  Mr. Murphy was only recently come back from the United
States, where he spent many prosperous years.  The happy couple were the
recipients of hearty good wishes for their future happiness from their neighbours and
numerous friends in town and country.

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A CATTLE DRIVE

Yesterday, at the Courthouse, Tuam, nine persons, including two women, were
brought up in custody before Mr. H. P. Shell, R. M., for driving off Cloonbar
farm, part of Mr. Percy B. Bernard's Cloonbar farm, part of Mr. Percy B
Bernard's Castlehacket estate, near Tuam, on the 3rd inst., 25 head of cattle, 60
sheep and 2 horses belonging to Thomas Healy, of Cloonsheen, who holds the farm
on 11 months' system.  The Mr. Bernard, their landlord, promising to let them
have the Cloonbar farm on 1st May for distribution amongst them.  They all
entered bail to be of good behaviour for the next 12 months, viz, Marin Corless,
Lawrence Moran, John Moran, Patrick Reid, jun.,  Michl. Doddy, and James
Feenaghty, all of Cloonbar, in 40 each, with two sureties each in 20 each ; Patk.
Reid, senr., of Cloonbar, self  in 20 with two sureties in 10 each ; and
Mary Feenaghty and Bridget Reidy, both of Cloonbar, in 10 each with two sureties
each in 5 each.

Messrs. John Keane and John Walsh, merchants, High Street, Tuam, became
sureties for them all.

(Full report in next Herald.)

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J. C.GARDINER TESTIMONIAL.

The following subscriptions of 1 have been received by the Hon., Treasurer,
Mr. W. S. Waithman : -

Sir Wm. Mahon, Bart, D.S.O. ; Walter Joyce, Michael Hynes, Major Ruttledge
Fair, M. T. Donnellan, James Behan, Sir Acheson MacCuliagh, General Henry, C. B.
; Professor Colohan, M. D. ; Martin Bodkin, R. T. St. George.  The Fund is
now closed.


PITHY PARS. - Personal, Paochial Provincial and Particular

The solicitor for the Orangewell prisoners, Dr. Nicholas O'Connell Comyn, was
born in 1869, the eldest son of Andrew Nugent Comyn, of Ballinderry.  He was
educated at Oscott, and is well known among Irish cricketers, especially as a
member of the Co. Galway team.  His father, Andrew Nugent Comyn, who is a J.P.
for counties of Clare and Galway, was born in 1831, the eldest son of
Nicholas Comyn, of Ballinderry, Co. Galway, and Ryefield, Co. Roscommon.  He married
in 1867, Mary, second daughter of John O'Connell, Esq., D.L., and grand
daughter of the Liberator.

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Surgeon General John Sarsfield Comyn, M.D., M.A., late Army Medical Service,
was born in 1837, the second son of Francis Comyn, of Woodstock, in this
county, and Kilcorney.  He was specially promoted to Brigade Surgeon for service in
Egypt in 1882.  He is Deputy Surgeon General. He retired lately.  He was
married to a daughter of General Owen.

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Father John Conmee, S. J., the head of the Jesuit order in Ireland, is a
Roscommon man, a member of one of the oldest Catholic families, who lost much for
their faith.  He was born in 1851, educated at Castleknock and Clongower from
1885 to 1891, and Supieror of St. Francis Xavier's, Dublin, from 1898 to 1905.
 He is one of the most eloquent pulpuit preachers in Ireland.  He had lately
been in delicate health, but is now almost recovered.

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The Most Rev. Dr. O'Dea is the son of the late Michael O'Dea, Esq. of
Kilfenora, Co. Clare, and was born in 1850.  He was educated at Maynooth when he
laboured after ordination on the professional staff, and he was Vice President of
Maynooth College from 1883-5 and President from 1885 till his consecration in
1904.

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Colonel George Patrick Chevers, late 4th Connaught Rangers, and J. P. for Co.
Galway, resident at Portummna, in this county, was born in 1834, son of
Patrick Obevers, R.M., by Ellen daughter of George Cashel, of Sallee House,
Tipperary.

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John J. Clancy, K.C. and M.P., for North Dublin, was born in 1847, at Carragh
Lodge, Claregalway, the son of William Clancy, Esq.  He was educated at
Summerhill College, Athione, and Queen's College, Galway.

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John Joseph Cheevers, D.L. and J.P. for Co. Galway, of Killyan, in this
county, was lately a captain in the 4th Connaught Rangers, and born in 1866.  He
was educated at Beaumont College, and married in 1894, to Frederick, daughter of
Henry Owen Lewis, D.L., of Enniskeen.

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The wonderful success of G.W. Bacon's great Atlas of the World, has induced
him to meet the popular requirements by issuing a guinea edition of the same. 
The edition, termed "The Populare Atlas and Gazette of the World" embraces the
whole of the more expensive work, with the omission only of the divisional
maps, so that every country is still well represented in the 100 pages of maps
and 100 supplementary maps of the chief ports, thus constituting the best
guinea atlas extant.

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In Boffin Island, purchased by the Congested Districts Board, from Mr. Cyril
Allies, J. P., there are a goodly number of tenement houses already built and
others in course of construction.  Having visited all the building sans doute
reflect great credit on the gentleman, Mr. P. B. O'Dea., under surveillance
they are being erected.  Having interviewed this very affable and courteous
official at that portion of the island known as the East End we were able to
ascertain without the disclosure of any official secrets the vast amount of good
the Board has been doing for the distressed tenantry of this island.  The
excursionists feel it an imperative duty to tender their sincerest thanks to this
unassuming and unpretensious young gentleman for the interview given them.

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At Athenry Thomas Murphy, a Galway fish merchant, was returned for trial to
the Assizes on a charge of obtaining 80 by false pretences from Francis J.
Finnerty, Licensed Trader, Athenry branch of the Ulster Bank after he had first
got Finnerty to endorse it for him.  The cheque, which was on the National Bank
was returned "unpaid," "account closed."  It was stated that prisoner had
since repaid the amount, 40 in cash, and a promissory note for the remainder,
with which Finnerty expressed himself satisfied.  The accused was admitted to
bail.

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In Connamara the weather is so uncertain and changeable, turning from good to
bad, that the farming classes say without a doubt it will be a late season.

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A grand specimen of a trout was caught by a Mr. Michael Walsh, living near
Corrib View, on the artificial fly last week.  This goes to show what a lake the
Corrib is, when a trout of such size can be got, 10 lbs. Weight.  The play
was on a Castle Connell rod 1 hour before the fish was landed.

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Rev. Ml Faherty, C. C., Oughterard, has been transferred to be P. P. of
Spiddal.

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Messrs. Gill & Co., of Dublin, have published "The Abbey of Ross : Its
History and Details," an interesting treatise by the late Sir Oliver Joseph Burke,
B.L., for which a new editor has been found by the publishers, whose name is
not given however.  Its popularity is easily understood by any one who reads it,
as it gives a full historical account of one of the great seats of learning
and piety which made our island famous in olden times.  The author knows how to
deal with his subject, and in describing the ancient glories and modern decay
of the grand old pile he makes each stone tell a living story.  It reads like
an old-time romance more than a plain history.  Interesting also are the
descriptions of the different apartments in the great Abbey, and the uses for
which they were set apart.  One sees the beautiful building once more peopled with
scholars and sages, and hears the subdued hum of life within its hallowed
walls in reading this story of the eventful past and of the great names that were
enrolled in its register from its foundation in 1851.

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A small farmer named Hogan dropped dead at his residence, Ballindooly on
Wednesday.  Deceased had been several times threatened that if he didn't give up a
farm which he held under the eleven months' system he should mark the
consequences, and finally he surrendered the place at considerable loss.  Another
farm which he held under the same system he refused to give up, as it was his
only means of support with notice of surrender on the 1st of May, and this, it is
believed, so preyed on his mind that it resulted in his sudden demise.  He
leaves a wife and 8 young children to mourn his loss.  Deceased was only 45
years of age.

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Reports from the mackerel fishing industry at Cleggan since the opening of
the season a few days ago are very satisfactory.  There are at present ten boats
engaged in the industry, and the catches by each boat so early in the season
have exceeded the expectations of the fishermen.  On the first night of the
venture some of the nets got broken, so great was the draught of fishes.  This,
however, has been attributed to the nets having been too dry before being
used.  It is also stated that white trout have been taken in some of the nets. 
There are at present representatives from five fish buyers from England as
Cleggan who are paying at the rate of 15s per 1,000 for the mackerel.  An addition
is being built so the pier, so as to afford safer and better accommodation for
the mooring of boats.

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Rev Father Connelly, C.C., Carracastle, who had been absent in America for
almost two years, returned to Ireland recently.  The object of his mission to
America was to raise funds for erecting a new wing to Ballaghaderreen College.

After discharging all liabilities for the last financial year, Castlebar
Urban Council finds itself in the happy position of having the substantial sum of
554 to credit.

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Following an advance party of four, over twenty engineers of the Ordinance
Survey Department will make Easkey their head quarters during the next few
months for the purpose of making a more accurate survey of that portion of the
country.  The men will parade every morning on Easkey bridge, after which the
day's operations will begin.

THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1909
TUAM, CO GALWAY


DIED

STEPHENS - At her residence, Ballinderry, Parish of Cummer, on the 9th inst.
Mrs. Stephens, relict of the late Mr. Michl. Stephens, and mother of Mr. John
Stephens, of same place, deeply lamented by all her friends and neighbours. 
The remains were buried at Kilmoylan on the 11th.  The funeral was large and
representative. - R.I.P.

MURPHY - On May 9th, Mr. Martin Murphy, of Curry, Parish of Cummer, after a
very brief illness, leaving a widow and a number of children to mourn his loss.
 Burial attended by an unusually large funeral, took place at Cummer on
Tuesday last. - R.I.P.

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PITHY PARS, - Personal, Parochial Provincial and Particular

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Mr. C. Mulvany, Co. Surveyor, told Castlerea District C___en that he was
about to introduce the steam-rolling system into Castlerea and Roscommon.  In
reply to a Councilor, he said that it would not incur any extra expense on the
rates.  When shall it commence in Galway?

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Owing to the gates having been shut up, fishing on the Claregalway river has
been satisfactory so far as the season has gone.  Eleven spring fish have been
killed by members, the largest about 23 lbs., being secured by Mr. R. Joyce.

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The Recorder of Galway has adjourned to next sessions the consideration or
the application by the father of the murdered constable Goldrick for 2,000
compensation for the loss of his son, stating that it would be desirable first to
dispose of the capital charge brought against the two men named Michael
Dermody and Thomas Hynes at Galway assizes.

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In Castlebar the new Technical Schools are fast nearing completion, and
prizes continue to pour in for the bazaar to be held in aid of the new buildings. 
The project is a very deserving one, and will receive a large amount of
support.

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We regret to announce the death of Mr. James J. Noone, Mount street,
Claremorris, which occurred at his residence. The deceased some time ago contracted a
severe cold, which developed into consumption, and when the first symptoms of
the dread scourge made their appearance all available precautions were taken
to save the young life, and Mr. Noone was sent to a sanatorium for treatment.

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Owing to the inclement weather of the first week of May mackerel fishing,
which had promised such good results, has been entirely suspended.  A week's
enforced idleness at this time is a serious loss, not only to fishermen, but to
numerous hands who await employment at packing, carrying, salting, &c.

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The marriage arranged between Michael P. Harding, National Bank, Roscommon,
son of the late George Harding, Charleville, and Mary Bourke Wright, daughter
of the late Rev. Canon W. Bourke Wright, M.A., of Athleague Vicarage, and
granddaughter of the late General John Wray Mitchell, R.A., of Castlestrange, Co
Roscommon, will take place in September.

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Mr. William Gladstone of Hawarden, who recently joined the Lord Lieutenant's
Secretarial Staff, recently visited the West.  He toured through the Congested
Districts Board, who has done so much to promote industries suitable to, the
congested districts, especially through the medium of lace and crochet
classes.  The tour included a visit to Benada Abbey, where a most successful lace
industry is established, and to the woollen mills at Foxlord, where for 18 years
past a successful woollen industry has been carried on.  A number of centres
where nurses working under Lady Dudley's scheme in connection with the Jubilee
Institute are stationed were visited.  The Aran Islands and other Islands were
visited on the coast and villages in remote districts were also visited.

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The Spring mackerel fishery has already began along the Connemara seaboard. 
On Tuesday. 2th April, the take in Cleggan amounted to some seventy boxes of
mackerel.  Prices ranged from 8s, 6d to 11s per 126 fishes.  The number of
fishing nobbeys(?) falls short in the latter place of what one was wont to see
yearly since its inception.  This is owing to the fact that they are withdrawn to
Roundstone and Bunowen.

THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909
TUAM, CO GALWAY


DIED

CONNOLLY - At London, Saturday, May 8th, Gerald Vincent, second son of
Bartholomew Connolly, Connaught Buildings, Galway, in his 27th year.

MAHON - May 13th, 1909, Annie, daughter of the late William Mahon, Clonfree,
Strokestown, Co Roscommon, and Mrs Mahon, 4 Belgrave Park, Rathmines.

O'NIELL POWER - May 13, 1909, at Ryehill, Co Galway, Helen, dearly beloved
wife of Bernard O'Neill Power, and daughter of the late Pierce Joyce, D.L., of
Mervue.

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PITHY PARS. - Personal, Parochial Provincial and Particular

We deeply regret to record the death at Ryehill on Wednesday last of Helen,
the beloved wife of Bernard O'Neill Power, Esq. our respected and popular
neighbour.  Deceased was a daughter of the late Pierce Joyce, Esq, D.L., of Mervue,
in this county, one of the oldest and most esteemed Catholic families who
held high place in the esteem of the people as well as in their own class.  Mrs.
Power was greatly liked by all who knew her, and her lamented death brings
deserved sadness and mourning not only to her own immediate circle but to many
families in the county.  The funeral on Saturday was private.

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The Portumna races were held last week to the satisfaction of the organizers,
the programme being full, Clare, Leitrim, Limerick, Cork, Galway, Kerry,
King's and Queen's Counties being represented.  The local Temperance Band id its
best to increase the enjoyment.  Amongst the items played was a piece entitled
- "East Galway Hunt," the composition of Mrs. Dr. Kelly, Portumna, who is a
member of a talented Tuam family, daughter of the late Dr. Thomas Bodkin, of
Eastland House, Tuam.

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Mr. E. Hazleton, who has been cashier for nine years at the Galway Branch of
the National Bank, has been transferred, on promotion as accountant, to Ennis.
 The numerous friends of Mr. Hazleton in Galway regret his departure, but are
much pleased to hear of his well-merited advancement in the service of the
Bank.

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A new post office was recently opened in Claremorris, and we are informed
that the furniture and fittings, which cost something over 250, were all
purchased in England.  One would imagine that such things as presses, desks,
counters, and pigeon-hole shelves could be procured in Ireland.  We hope the matter
will be cleared up.

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Mr. M. P. Harding, who for many years was Accountant in the National Bank,
Roscommon, has been appointed Manager of the New Ross branch, and leaves there
next week.  Mr. Harding was some years ago stationed in Tuam, and a most
efficient and popular official he was.  His Team friends rejoice in his promotion.

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A marriage has been arranged, and will shortly take place, between Robert
Dolphin Tighe, B.L., of Edmonton, Alta Canada, second son of Thomas Tighe, D.L.,
of the The Heath, Co. Mayo, and Eugenie, only child of Mr. H. Pagnuelo, of St.
Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, and granddaughter of the late Hon. L.V. Sicotte, ex
Premier of Lower Canada.

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Several Mayo tragedies took place last week.  On Monday an inquest was held
on a man named Malley, who died in the County Infirmary from injuries received
on the railway line at Foxford ; and on Wednesday another inquest was held
touching the death of a young man from Balla, who died on Tuesday as a result of
a blow of a bar of iron on the head, accidentally received on the 21st
February inst.  During the week a carpenter in Foxford committed suicide by hanging
himself, and in Castlebar a case of drowning occurred, a man named O'Donnell
having been found in the Church Lake ; and from Ballinrobe come details of
another drowning, an old man named Duddy of Creggduff, being found dead in a
running stream.  During the past week scarcely a day passed without a patient, and
some days two, being committed to Castlebar Lunatic Asylum.

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We have to announce that preparations for the grand bazaar and fete, in aid
of the repair and improvement of the Abbey Church in Galway are in full swing. 
The Very Revd. Fr. Fitzgerald, the energetic Guardian of the Franciscans, is
sparing no effort to push on the arrangements, and we are glad that the
members of the Ladies' Committee are also working with commendable energy in the
good cause.  The Franciscans have been connected with Galway for many centuries. 
Their connection with that city dates back to the earliest days of its
ancient prosperity.  They witnessed the rise and fall of the trade and commerce of
Galway, and they are with us yet.  Before their estates were confiscated they
owned extensive lands in and about Galway, but they were shorn of them, and
consequently, like the Augustinians, they became very poor.  That the Franciscans
both in Galway and the county took an active and practical interest in public
improvements is beyond question, and "The Friars' Cut" on Lough Corrib is an
instance of that.  It is a fine waterway and an indispensable facility for
trade from Galway on the lake, and it is a great advantage to the steamers,
tourists, rowing clubs and all who make use of the lake for business or recreation
purposes.  Works of maintenance and improvements have, of course, from time to
time being carried out in the Abbey Church, and we hope the citizens will
give the Very Revd. Guardian and the members of the Franciscan community every
assistance in their power towards the Bazaar to raise a fund for the purpose of
carrying out the repairs.

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William Kinnane, Curraghmore, aged 105 years was buried at Ballindine last
week.  The deceased was of robust frame, and retained a wonderful vitality until
a short time before his death.


THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1909
TUAM, CO. GALWAY


BIRTHS

BOURKE - May 19, 2909, at 63 Lower Baggot street, Dublin, the wife of
Geoffrey Bourke, Oldtowne, Ballindine, Co Mayo, of a son.

CHEVERS - May 19, 1909, at Killyan, Co Galway, the wife of John J. Chevers,
Esq., D.L., of a son.

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DIED

PERSSE - At Renmore, Galway, Rose, widow of Major William Norton Persse.
D.L., of Roxborough, County Galway/

DOYLE - May 16th, 1909, at 56 Shelbourne road, Dublin, Mrs. Honoria Doyle,
aged 86 years, widow of the late Edward J. Doyle, Maryboro and Inchicall, and
fondly-loved mother of Nurse Doyle, Infirmary, Westport, Co Mayo.

BUCHANAN - May 16th, 1909, at his residence, Tobberocann (?), Ayle, Andrew
Buchanan, aged, 50 years.

CUSACK - On the 13th May, 1909, at her residence, Bridge street, Westport,
Kate Cusack, aged 39 years.

LLOYD - May 24th, 1909, at 19 Allesbury road, Dublin, Frances Dorothea,
daughter of the late Guy Llyod, Esq., D.L., of Croghan, Co Roscommon.

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PITHY PARS. - Personal, Parochial Provicial and Particular

At the recent school examinations of the Royal Academy of Music and the Royal
College of Music, Miss Garvey gained distinction.  She is a member of the
community "La Sainte Union des Sacre Coeurs."  Athlone, Westmeath, and a daughter
of the late Dr. Garvey, of Cornfield, Hollymount, and of the late Mrs. Stella
Garvey, the popular novelist, and niece of Colonel Michael Doheny, who was so
prominently connected with the 48 movement.  We wish her every success in the
future.

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Quinultagh, near Dunmore, is derived from Ultach - an Ulsterman.  Along the
Western and Southern slopes of Sliabh Dart there are many thickly-populated
villages.  The advent of this population to the locality synchronises with the
Plantation of Ulster hundreds of years ago, and these people, who are still
decidedly clannish, are the descendants of the expropriated Catholic tenantry of
parts of Ulster, who, dispossessed of their farms and homesteads in the Black
North, took up their residence on this heather-growing range, which reminded
them of their native homes amid the dark mountains of Tyrone and Donegal.  They
still cherish many traditions of the olden times, when their forefathers had
to carry long dirks to defend themselves at fairs and markets, and of the
faction fights when, standing together like one man, they always gained the day.

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We find, says a reverend and learned correspondent, reference is made to
Dunmore in the annals of the Four Masters as early as A.D. 1133, when MacCarthy
and Conor O'Brien, of Munster, destroyed it.  In A.D. 1155 Murthough O'Loughlin
burned the town and raised the walls to the ground.  In A.D. 1177 Milo de
Cogan occupied Dunmore with 40 men at arms, 200 horse soldiers, and 300 archers. 
King Rory O'Connor after a successful attack put this army to fight ; and the
English did not encamp until they reached the other side of the Shannon at
Lanesboro.  In A.D. 1558, Captain Mordaunt led an English army from Lanesboro
through Roscommon.  It is recorded that the English soldiers raised a mutiny
against the captain in the town, and to be marched them back again.

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Mountbellow Sports under the G.A.A. Laws, will be held in the Show Grounds,
on Thursday. 10th June, and promise to be a great success.  There are no less
than fifteen events on the programe, including a tug-of-war contest, which
promises to be a particularly interesting affair, Mr. M. Moran, hon. sec. to the
Sports Committee, is leaving nothing undone to make the fixture a huge success.

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"I am an old vagabond, a widow, and a night-flier," Mrs Bridget Flaherty,
told the magistrates sitting at Gort Petty Sessions on Thursday last during the
hearing of a case in which she was summoned for threatening language.

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"Health and Strength" Co. have issued two excellent handbooks.  A book of
Walking and "Tricks of Self-Defence."  They are eminently practical and useful,
being well and intelligently written and sure to have a large sale.  They are
selling at one shilling, and published at 12 Burleigh Street, Strand, London,
W.C.

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The death of Miles Ferrick,. For twenty-five years a well known resident of
Butte, Montana, occurred on April 25.  Decease was born in County Galway
forty-seven years ago.

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There seems to be a big row brewing about the men's bathing place at
Blackrock, Galway.  Colonel O'Hara refuses to allow the Urban Council of Galway to put
up the springboard, unless on certain conditions which the Council refuses to
accept.

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Information wanted of Patrick, John and James Murray, who left Carropadden,
Dunmore, Co Galway, thirty-five or forty years ago, Patrick went to California
about 1876 or 1880.  John was on a visit to James at 83 Wyckoff street,
Brooklyn, N.Y., in May, 1879.  They have one sister Winifred, still living in
Ireland.  Thomas Kenny, who lived in Thompsonville, Hartford, Conn., about the year
1880.  Address James M. Clancy, 92 Federal Street, West Lynn, Mass.

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We are pleased to see that Messrs. Naughton and Co., Tuam, are at present
carrying out extensive alterations in their business premises, which are under
the capable management or MR. Butler.

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At Loughrea Guardians meeting, a relieving officer said he gave a ticket to
an old worame named Margaret O'Neill, who, he was informed, had 1,500 in bank.

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Lord and Lady Oranmore have let their house in Cavendish place, London, for a
few weeks to Lord and Lady Buckinghamshire, and are staying at Englefield
Green for a time, as Lady Oranmore has been far freom well lately.

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Colonel Courtenay, C.B., D.L., was hon sec of the ball on the 24th inst., in
aid of the Co Galway Stall, which was such a complete success - one of the
very best given this season.  The tickets were limited to 250.  The ball took
place in the Pillar Room, Rotunda, Dublin, commencing at 10 o'clock.  The
energetic committee were Lady Clonbrock, Clonbrock, Ahascragh ;Lady Ashtown
(President), Woodlawn, Co Galway ; Duchesse de Stackpoole, Mount Hazel, Ballymacward ;
Lady Sophie Grattan-Bellew, Mount Bellew; Lady Phillips Waithman, Merlin Park,
Galway ; Lady Sophie Grattan-Bellew, Mount Bellew ; Lady Phillipps Waithman,
Merlin Park, Galway ; Hon Mrs. Algernon Persse, Craggclare, Ardrahan ; Hon
Mrs. Campbell, Moycullen House, Moycullen, Lady Shaw, Bushy Park, Terenure; Lady
Arnot, 12 Merrion square; Lady Walker, Pembroke House, Upper Mount street ;
Lady Morris 48 Lower Leeson street ; Mrs. Anderson, 23 Upper Fitzwilliam street
; Mrs. Lynch-Athy, Renville, Oranmore ; Mrs. Percy Bernard, Collegnes,
Booterstown ; Mrs. Berridge, Ballynahinch Castle, Co Galway; Mrs. W. Blakeney, 14
Fitzwilliam square ; Mrs. Browne, The Albany, Monkstown ; Mrs. Chatterton, New
Park, Blackrock ; Mrs Chevera, Killyan, Ballinasloe ; Mrs. Arthur Courtenay, 1
Eaton square, Monkstown ; Mrs. Daly, Dunsandie(?), Athenry ; Mrs. Lambert,
Castle Ellen, Athenry ; Mrs. T. Wilson-Lynch, Belmont, Galway ; Mrs. O. Hara,
Lenaboy, Galway ; Mrs. Persse, Roxboroough, Loughrea, Mrs. F. Shawe-Taylor,
Ardrahan ; Mrs. Teeling, 32 Upper Mount street, Mrs. P. Chenevix-Trench, 5
Fitzwilliam place ; Mrs. Woods S_____, Galway.

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Money Found.

In September or October last, a sum of money was found on the road between
Tuam and Beclare.  Owner, giving a description of the money, can have it on
application to office, Tuam Herald, and paying cost of this advertisement.


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Submitted by: Jim
British Isles Family History Society - USA, Newsletter Editor
http://www.rootsweb.com/~bifhsusa

 


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