IRELAND OLD NEWS



The Tuam Herald, Saturday, April 3, 1909
Tuam, Co Galway


PITHY PARS. - Personal Parochial Provincial and Particular

The Galway April fair will be held on Wednesday, 7th April.  This is a very
important fair and a large supply of stock will be shown.  Prices of cattle in
particular have a decided upward tendency lately, and as these fairs are well
advertised a large number of buyers are expected to attend.

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From the returns of the Registrar General for the week ending 20th March, it
appears that the death rate in Galway has reached the exceptionally small
figure of 15.5 [?] per 1,000, the smallest but one of the 22 principal provincial
urban districts of Ireland.  The average for the whole of Ireland in the same
period was 26.1[?]

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While quarrying in the Kilmovee, Co Mayo, district a man named Callaghan hit
upon a piece of ore one and a half pounds' weight which is believed to be
gold.  This is the second "find" of a similar nature in this quarry within the
past few years.

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At Co Mayo Assizes, in Castlebar, before Mr Justice Andrews, Patrick Lyons
(Insurance agent) charged with obtaining money under false pretenses, was
acquitted.  At Castlebar Quarter Sessions County Court Judge Morphy was presented
with white gloves.  His Honor, in acknowledgement, said he had very little
business to do since he came to Mayo six years ago.

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Two youths, Thomas Kelly, 17, and Laurence Curley, 16, in a spirit of play,
started to throw potatoes at each other in a Galway potato field.  The first
named chanced to hit Curley on the back of the head, from the effects of which
he died.  Kelly, who was brought up at the Galway Assizes charged with his
companion's death, was released by Judge Johnson after five minutes' detention.

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Investigations are being conducted in Claremorris by the Somerset House
Inspectors into the general administration of the Old Age Pensions Act in that
district.  The Inspectors are apparently satisfied with the statement of every
pensioner from the point of view of means, but without exception, they are having
a search made in the census papers of the years 1841 and 1851 for the age of
every successful claimant who in his application form stated that he was 75
years old or under.  They instructed the Postmaster of Claremorris not to cash
any paying orders except for those who had come before them and had given the
requisite information.  The local offices of the authorities were filled all
day with the old people, and as each was dealt with he or she was given back the
cheque book and a slip of paper with direction to the Postmaster to pay. 
This process was slow, and many of the old people had to remain in the town
longer than they expected.  It appears that on the question of determining the age,
the pension authorities are guided entirely by the census returns, and
although proofs are every day forthcoming of the unreliability of these records, yet
they will not deviate from the rule, except on the production of baptismal
certificates, which receive precedence.  As the district is now the seat of
operations, it may be interesting to cite some cases, which go to show the
unreliability of census returns. Martin Regan, Cultybo, lost his pension on a return
made from the census of 1851, which showed him to be only 68 years old, but
his book was soon afterwards restored on a certificate from the 1841 census,
according to which he was 74 years old.  Patrick Flaherty, of Corskeogh, was
refused a pension on the ground that, according to the 1851 census, he was only 68
years old, but later his application was passed on a return from the 1841
census, which showed him to be 71 years old.  The same applies to a Mrs. Anne
Kerrone, of Newtown, who was 68 according to the 1851 census, and 70 according to
the 1841 returns.

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A marriage was celebrated during last week in Claremorris, a record of which
is not likely to appear in the fashionable pars of a society journal.  The
marriage was contracted between two inmates of the Claremorris Workhouse, aged 84
and 79 respectively.

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One evening last week a man named Martin O'Connor, a carpenter by occupation,
and a native of Spiodal, was discovered lying on the roadside at Errismore, a
short distance from Clifden, in an unconscious state.  Having been removed to
a neighbouring house, it was there found by medical inspection that he had
been suffering from a fracture of the skull.  Medical aid was unavailing, as the
man did not recover consciousness, and died the following morning. The
deceased was well known in Galway, where he had a large connection.  He belonged to
a most respectable family.

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The sum of 100 has been granted out of the public funds to the father of the
late Constable Goldrick.

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A marriage has been arrange between Captain Aglionby, 3rd Battalion Connaught
Rangers, and Colonial Civil Service, and Joyce Williams Wynn, daughter of the
late Joseph Godman, of Park Hatch, and Mrs. Godman, 55 Lowndes Square, London.

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At Ballinasloe Asylum a serious outbreak of fever, which has been traced to
the supply of milk received from a contractor one of the members of whose
family has been down with the disease, has broken out among the Asylum staff. 
Another female attendant was also stricken with the disease.

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Some very important records and appeals - or where not important at least
interesting - were heard at Mayo Assizes last week. In the appeal brought by Mr.
Loftus, Ballina, against the decision of the County Court Judge awarding Miss
O'Connell, 55 compensation for disturbance under the Town Tenants' Act.  Mr.
Justice Johnson reduced the amount of the decree to 10 without costs.

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Under the patronage of the Governors and Committee of the Mayo County
Infirmary, in connection with an effort which is being made to equip thoroughly a
surgical ward, and otherwise to add to the facilities for the treatment and
comfort of the patients in that useful institution, it has been decided, in order
to raise funds for this very praiseworthy project, to organise a concert and
ball in Castlebar for the nights of Tuesday and Wednesday, 13th and 14th April
next, respectively.

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Salmon netting is now carried on actively on the Moy at Ballina and in the
upper waters and with fair results, considering the full state of the river and
that it is yet early in the season.

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Angling opened well last week on the Moy, the water in fairly good order. 
Jim Hearns after an hour's try succeeded in getting into a springer, which gave
play for about half an hour before he succeeded in getting him to net - a
beautifully made fish, weighing 11 lbs.  Master Ivan Garvey hooked what must have
been a 30 lb. Salmon.  The monster was hooked in the stream close by the weirs
and played hard for over three hours, and as a final he took the centre arch
of the bridge in a run, and before Master Garvey could get him well in hand
again he broke his hold, and was free once more.  During the struggle the bridge
was crowded with spectators, and every one felt sore at the young angler
losing his prize after such a long contest.

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The death is much regretted in Co Mayo of Dr T Griffin, M A, M D, Louisburgh,
who has passed away at the age of 62 years.  He was much esteemed, both in
his professional capacity and as a magistrate, and as a medical practitioner his
ability was appreciated beyond his own districts.  There is much sympathy
with Mrs. Griffin and family in their bereavement.

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MAN CUT IN TWO ON RAILWAY

The body of a Claddagh, Galway fisherman named Stephen Folan, who belonged to
the Naval Reserve, was found terribly mangled on Sunday morning on the
railway line between Craughwell and Athenry.  He was returning from a course of
naval training at Kinsale, and had 20 in his possession.  It is surmised that he
left the train at Craughwell, the next station to Athenry, and finding that it
had departed on his return, he proceeded to walk along the permanent way to
Athenry with a view to catching the Galway train.  Apparently he was overtaken
by a subsequent train and killed.

The body was practically cut in two.  An ugly feature of the occurrence is
that on discovery of the remains the 20 was missing.  Folan suspicious element
in the tragedy is the fact that splashes of blood were found in the carriage
when it arrived in Tuam, and one of the windows was broken.  The body
discovered only  a short distance outside of Athenry.

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One evening last week a man named Martin O'Connor, a carpenter by occupation,
and a nativeof Spiddal, was discovered lying on the roadside at
Errismore, a short distance from Clifden, in an unconscious state.  Having been removed
to a neighbouring house, it was there found by medical inspection that he had
been suffering from a fracture of the skull.  Medical aid was unavailing, as
the man did not recover consciousness, and died the following morning.  The
deceased was well known in Galway, where he had a large connection.  He belonged
to a most respectable family.

THE TUAM HERALD, SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 1909
TUAM, CO. GALWAY


DEATH OF REV'D. THOMAS CANON
RONAYNE, P.P.

But a few short months ago we, in common with his countless clerical friends
in the archdiocese, joined cordially in congratulating Canon Ronayne open the
jubilee of his fifty honoured years in the priesthood, and now the very
melancholy duty devolves upon us if recording his lamented death.  With him goes to
his assured reward as self sacrificing and zealous a priest as ever worked in
the Divine Vineyard in this country, where such rare devotion and zeal are to
be found in such superabundance.  He was one of the few priests as yet left in
the vast archdiocese of Tuam whom Dr. MacHale had ordained and promoted.  One
by one they are fast falling out of the ranks, having each and all earned the
crown of an honoured and useful missionary life.  Canon Ronayne has been some
forty years P.P. of Mount Bellew, and the evidences of his splendid energy
and ceaseless attention to duty are to be found in the renovated and re-built
churches and schools which bear testimony today in the united parishes of Mount
Bellew and Moylough to his conduct and character as a priest.  He will be
greatly missed, for he was a favourite with all classes and creeds and a man of
singularity amiable disposition, yet withal firm in his beliefs and steadfast
opinions while tolerant of those of others.  Some few years ago his brother,
Father Jas. Ronayne, who had been his excellent curate, died P.P. of Moore. Canon
Ronayne was a native of the archdiocese and educated at St. Jarlath's and
Maynooth.  His first curacy was Ballinrobe, and he was soon appointed by Dr.
MacHale to the united parishes of Mount Bellew and Moylough some time about the
singular energy, zeal and devotion, earning the affection of his parishioners
and the esteem of his neighbours of other creeds.

(From a Correspondent).
High Mass was celebrated at Mount Bellew on the 7th inst  for the eternal
repose of the soul of the late Canon Ronayne.  The sad news of his death filled
the hearts of his parishioners with grief and sadness.  It is no exaggeration
to say that his name will be long remembered and revered by us.   While the
chief object of the late Canon's desires was our spiritual and educational
welfare, still he was never forgetful of our temporal interests.  The poor had in
him a sincere friend on whom they could always rely.  He always stood by the
poor in their necessities.  He was therefore a splendid type of the ideal Irish
priest.  We hope the devout and fervent prayers of his parishioners will add
to the precious crown - life everlasting - promised to the good and faithful
servant.

Rev T. Heany, C. C., acted as celebrant; Rev A. Eaton, deacon; Rev M.
Donnellan, C. C., sub-deacon; master of ceremonies, Very Revd. Canon Macken, Adm.

His Grace the Most Rev Dr. Healy presided in the choir.

The following clergymen were present in the choir: -

Very Rev Canon Canton, P.P.; Very Rev Canon Macken, Adm; Very Rev M. Higgins,
D. D.; Very Rev M. Kealty, D. D.; Rev J Curran, P. P.; Rev J. Burke, P.P.;
Rev J. Keaveny, P.P.; Rev J. Heany, P.P.; Rev M. Heany, P.P.; Rev J. Fallon,
P.P.; Rev M. Fallon, P.P.; Rev P. Colgan, P.P.; Rev W. Conway, P.P.; Rev W.
McHugh, P.P.; Rev W Ratigan, Adm; Rev M. Diskin, P.P.; Rev F. Shanagher, P.P.; Rev
T. Joyce. P.P.; Rev E. Dalton, C.C.; Rev J. Morgan, Professor St. Jarlath's; 
Rev. F. McDermott. C.C.; Rev O Hannon, C. C.; Rev J. Burke, Rev F. Ronayne,
C.C.; Rev B. Ronayne, Maynooth; Rev M. Morris, Rev J. Noone, C.C.; Rev J. tuffy,
C.C.; Rev T. Byrne, C.C.; Rev P. O'Loughlin, C.C.; Rev M. Brennen, C.C.

After Mass his Grace the Archbishop addressed the congregation at
considerable length and referred to the splendid labours of the deceased for the church
which he served so faithfully and well for more than half a century.  His Grace
appealed to the people to remember their late pastor in their prayers, and to
humbly beg of God to-day to accept the Holy Sacrifice if the Mass on his
behalf and to have mercy on his soul and to grant him eternal rest.  Amen.
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DEATH OF COLONEL BURKE.

We deeply regret to record the death in London on Sunday of Lieutenant
Colonel Sir Theolbald Burke, Bart., of Glynsk and Knocknagur in this county.  The
deceased baronet was born in Waterslade House, Tuam, as were all his brothers -
the most noted of whom was Thomas Henry Burke, the lamented murdered Under
Secretary for Ireland, Sir Theobald, who was in his 76th year, saw distinguished
service in the Army and was in the 18th Regiment in the Crimea and in the
Indian Mutiny.  He succeeded his brother, Sir Lionel, in 1884, as 13th baronet,
and with his death disappears from the peerage the fine old honoured and
historic title of the Burkes of Glynsk.  He was owner of several estates in this
county, particularly those of Knocknagur and Knockdoe, in the neighbourhood of
Tuam, and the best relations always existed between his family and their tenants/

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Sir Theobald Hubert Burke (13th Bart.) of Glinsk, (late Col. 18th Royal Irish
Regiment), died in London on 4th inst. aged 76.  The deceased gentleman had
seen distinguished service.  Having entered the Army (88th Connaught Rangers)
at an early age, he went through the Crimean war and the Indian Mutiny, and
afterwards exchanged into the 18th Royal Irish Regiment.  He succeeded in the
Baronetcy his cousin, Sir John-Lionel, in 1884.

Sir Theobald was the last male representative of his family, and also the
last of a band of seven brothers, all remarkable for their good looks as well as
for their mental abilities.

The Burkes entered Connaught as conquerors 700 years ago, and it is 600 years
since Sir Theobald's ancestor settled at Glinsk (in the N.E. of this county),
separating form the branckh of the family afterwards ennobled with the title
of Clanricarde.  The McDavid Burkes, (as the Glinsk family were called), have
always claimed to be the elder branch of the name, and bore a different crest
from that of the others (viz., live ostrich feathers rising out of a ducal
coronet), the badge of Baldwin of Flanders, King of Jerusalem, from whom the
Burkes claim to descend.  (See "Journal of the Galway Archaelogical and Historical
Society," Vol III Page 57 and Vol. IV. Page 113).  The Baronetcy was created
in 1628 in favour of Sir Ulick Burke, who was the builder of the magnificient
castle, or rather castellated mansion, of the name, fortunately still standing
and in perfect preservation, except that it is roofless.  This building is
therefore of the first half 17th century and of great architectural importance
as marking the transition from the high strong castle of earlier days to the
modern mansion; and, it is to be hoped that, whereas the lands on which it
stands are about to be sold to the Estates Commissioners, the latter will have it
vested in one of the public bodies empowered to take custody of such notable
monuments.  Poor Sir Ulick did not long enjoy his castle.  Being foreman of the
famous Grand-jury of Co. Galway empannelled by order of Wentworth (afterwards
Lord Strafford) to vote the right of the English Crown to a head rent off the
lands of Ireland, and which nobly refused to agree to such usurpation; he,
with D'Arcy, the High Sheriff, was heavily fined and imprisoned in Dublin Castle.
 It must have been very shortly after his return to Co Galway that the
Cromwellians carried war into this country, and at its conclusion, Sir Ulick,
together with other royalists, was exiled.  Returning home finally he soon was at
enmity with some of his neighbours, the O'Conors, who besieged and burnt the
Castle.  The family, however, resided close beside it until they had to sell the
property after the great Irish Famine.

About mile from the Castle of Glinsk stands the ruined church of
Ballinakill, containing a splendid recumbent effigy of a knight in armour, said to be
that of the first de Burgh to come to Ireland, or else the first of the name to
settle at Glinsk (for a representation, see "Journal of the Galway
Archaeological and Historical Society," Vol. II, Page 136).  A cast of above has been
placed in the National Museum, Dublin.

Mr. William Burke, father of the late Sir Theobald, resided for some years in
Tuam, Waterslade House, where his son, the late Under Secretary for Ireland,
was born.  He also at one time occupied Barbersfort, in the neighbourhood of
this town.

Sir Theobald died a firm believer in and a staunch supporter of the old
religion, to which his family had remained true all through the penal times.  He
died unmarried, and leaves one sister now residing on the continent.

MARRIED

MORIARTY AND DOLPHIN - April 2, 1909, at the University Church Stephen's
Green, to Mr. Dolphin, of Turo, Co Galway.

McGRATH and McHUGH - On 4th April 1909, at the Cathedral, Tuam, by Very Rev
Canon Macken, Adm, James McGrath, Kilcloghans, Tuam to Mary, daughter of Mr.
Hugh McHugh, Circular Road, Tuam.

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DIED

GREENHAM - On Wednesday, 7th April, 1909 ??ter residence, Kilelloghans (?),
Tuam, Mrs. Greenham, wife of Mr. Geoprge Greenham; deeply regretted in the town
and vicinity.  Burial yesterday (Friday) at St. Mary's Cemetery, Tuam.

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We are especially pleased to see that Mr. Michael Kelly, of the Estate Duty
Office at the Custom House, Dublin, has been recently promoted to a position of
great trust and importance in that Department, thus proving the high opinion
entertained of his capacity and efficiency and the value put upon his
services.  He is known to be an exceptionally able official and is certain of still
further deserved promotion, Mr. Kelly is a Galway man, son of the late Michael
Kelly of Myre Hill ? Headford, and his many county friends will hear of his
advancement with pleasure we are sure.

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The little daughter of Lord and Lady Oranmore and Browne was christened at
St. Andrew's Church, Well Street, London, on Saturday afternoon, receiving the
name of Christine Louise Beatrice.  The god parents included Princess Marie
Louise of Schleswig Holstein, Lady Waterford, Mrs. Cazalet, Lord Duncannon,
(brother of Lady Oranmore), and Mr. Montagn Guest (uncle of Lady Oranmore).

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Messrs. Harrington Brothers of Cork, in extending their chemical business to
embrace the manufacture of colours and varnishes, has added an important asset
to Irish industry.  Those who desire to mix their own paints need no longer
compulsority help to swell the pockets of foreign colour manufacturers, but can
now procure Irish-made colours in the read mixed article can also obtain it
Irish-made throughout.

APRIL 10, 1909

PITHY PARS. - Personal, Parochial Provincial and Particular

We are pleased to hear that Mr. J. C. Gardiner having resigned his
appointment as R. M., it is suggested that after his long services of 31 years in County
Galway that some mark of the esteem in which he is held by every one should
be presented to him.  The subscription is limited to 1.  Mr. S. Waithman Of
Merlin Park, has kindly consented to act as Treasurer, and any subscriptions
sent to him will be acknowledged, and the names appear from time to time in local
papers.  This is a most deserving and popular object and will, we are sure,
be widely supported by all creeds and classes.

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Louis C. B. Brennan, the famous inventor of the Brennan Torpedo, in use in
the British Navy, was born in Castlebar in 1852.  Having emigrated to Australia
in boyhood he was apprenticed to a Civil Engineer in Melbourne, and where the
future torpedo of England's powerful navy was first conceived in the fertile
brain of the inventor when he was but twenty-two years of age.  Thirteen years
later, in 1897, the Government by the advice of the Admiralty bough Mr
Brennan's invention for ten thousand pounds.  Mr. Brennan's latest triumph is an
adaptation of the gyroscope to the mono rail, a device which he demonstrated
before the Royal Society in 1907.  Mr. Brennan lives near Woolwich and is married
to Miss Quinn of Castlebar.

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Sir Henry George Burke, Baronet, J.P. and D.L. for the County Galway, was
born at Marble Hill in 1859, the second son of the late Sir Thomas Burke, third
baronet (the baronetcy was created in 1799) and some time member for the County
Galway, by Lady Mary Nugent, daughter of the 9th Earl of Westmeath.  Sir
Henry was educated at the Oratory School and Trinity College, Dublin, of which he
is a B.A.  He succeeded his brother in 1880, and was High Sheriff for Galway
in 1883 and held a commission in the 4th Battalion Connaught Rangers 1881-5. 
He is unmarried.

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William Anthony Burke, B.L., was born in 1866, the fourth son of Sir Thomas
Burke, Bart., of Marble Hill, in this county.  He was educated at Oscott, and
married in 1889  Coralie, daughter of Captain Power Lalor, of Loug Orchard, Co.
Tipperary, called to the Irish Bar in 1890.  His wife is a clever writer, the
author of "The Value of Life," to which Dr. Barry con  tributed a preface,
and "Child Study and Education," prefaced by Rev. Dr. Hogan.

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John Butler Burke, M. A., of Cambridge and Dublin, is a well known Physicist
and Biologist.  He was born in 1871, son of John Burke, M.D., of Ower,
Headford, in this county, by Victoria, only daughter of Benjamin Burke, of Manila. 
He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, of which he is a mathematical
scholar, senior moderator and gold medallist.  He graduated in 1900? In Research as
an advanced student of Trinity College, Cambridge; some time lecturer at
Mason's College, Birmingham, and a Berkeley.  Fellow of Owens College, Manchester.
 Since 1905 he has written and lectured on his experiments at the Cavendish
Laboratory, Cambridge, and his book, "The Origin of Life" (published in 1906)
which has attained a world-wide circulation, supplies new evidence to support
the theory as old as Aristotle that the living was at one time produce from the
non-living, a theory which, in Mr. Butler Burke's opinion, if established,
need offer to the straitest orthodoxy no apprehension.

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The "Daily Sketch" is a new claimant to public favour and an admirable
claimant it is .  It is only a half penny paper, but it is full of pictures and
reading matter of interest.  In Friday's issue is a photograph of Mr. J. C.
Gardiner, R. M., with Mr. P. J. Daly, J.P., standing beside him at their shooting
lodge is the wilds of Connemara.

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We deeply regret to record the death at her residence in London of Mrs. John
Burke at the advanced age of 86 years.  The sad event occurred last week. 
Deceased was a native of Tuam, her father being Mr. Jackson, organist of St.
Mary's Cathedral, one of the most respected inhabitants of this old town in his
day.  He died here universally esteemed and regretted.  Miss Jackson married Mr.
John Burke, also a Tuam man, and one of its old stock and most respected
families.  Leaving Ireland some fifty years ago they settled in London where Mr.
Burke, by his talents, industry and great intelligence, soon won for himself a
high place in the commercial world.  He established a now well known firm of
accountants, and it is now being run most successfully by his only son, John
Nugent Burke, Esq.

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Mr. J. C. Gardiner, the poplual R. M. who has just retired after 31 years
satisfactory service in Galway, is son of the late Major John Gardiner, D.L., of
Farnhill, Killala, who was Secretary to the Mayo Grand Jury for many years,
and whose only other surviving son and daughter reside at Cortoon, Killala.

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Mr. J. M. Kilkelly, formerly of Mossfort, Tuam, has retired from the position
of Resident Magistrate for County Longford - a position he has occupied now
for thirteen or fourteen years.  Mr. Kilkelly is brother of Mrs. R. A. Clarke,
of Thomastown, Belclare, and was married to the only daughter of the late
George Henry Moore, Esq., M.P., for Mayo.

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Information wanted of Mary Sheridan, alias O'Donnell, born in Pittsburgh, PA,
and left there two years ago for New York.  Had a brother, a blacksmith by
trade, who resided in Charles street, Wellsburg, West Va, in 1901.  Address her
cousin, Patrick Foley, Killoiugh, Spiddal, Co Galway.

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Information wanted of the relatives of John Connolly, who came to Ireland
about six months ago, and resided first at Clifden, Co Galway, and then Galway
City, where he died about a month ago.  Is supposed to have a wife and son
living somewhere in Pennsylvania.  A small estate awaits the heirs-at-law.  Address
any information to John C. Conroy, Solicitor, 4  St. Francis Street, Galway.

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Information wanted of Patrick, John and James Murray,, who left Carrapadden,
Dunmore, Co Galway, thirty-five or forty years ago.  Patrick went to
California about 1876 or 1880.  John was on a visit to James at 83 Wyckoff street,
Brooklyn, N.Y., in May, 1879.  They have one sister, Winifred, still living in
Ireland.  Information is also wanted of their cousin, Mrs. Thomas Kenny, who
lived in Thompsonville, Hartford, Conn, about the year 1880.  Address James M.
Clancy, 92 Federal Street, West Lynn, Mass.

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The number of dog licenses granted in Galway for the year ended 31st March,
is 880.  For the Oranmore district 600 was granted and for Moycullen 300.  The
clerical work involved in the issue of the licenses was efficiently discharged
under the control of Mr. R. T. St. George, Clerk of Petty Sessions.  We have
not got the numbers for Tuam, Dunmore and Derreen.

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Captain F. J. Byrne, of the Connact Rangers, is seconded for service on the
staff.  Lieutenant A. H. B. Wright is promoted Captain.

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Last Sunday week the semi-finals of the Tuam Catholic Temperance Society's
Billlard Hanicap closed when Mr. Tom Warde rec. 20, defeated Mr. M. Heskin, rec.
20, after a keenly contested game.  When the word went round that Mr. Heskin
was beaten keen disappointment was felt, as in the former games he showed good
form and it looked as if he went under to Mr. M McHugh, and the final between
the latter and Mr. Ward played on Wednesday night was won by Mr. M. McHugh
rather easily.

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We regret to announce the death of Mr. Henry Burke, merchant, Claremorris,
which occurred at his residence, Church street, on Monday evening, after a
protracted illness.  On Wednesday morning at 10:20 o'clock Solemn Requiem Mass was
celebrated, the celebrant being Rev. J. Tuffy, C.C.

The Tuam Herald, Saturday, April 17, 1909
Tuam, Co Galway


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FUNERAL OF THE LATE MRS. GREENHAM

As we announced in these columns last week there occurred at her residence
early on the 7th inst., the death of Mrs. Mary Anne Greenham, wife of Mr. George
Greenham, the Demeane, and mother of the courteous and popular Assistant
Stationmaster, Tuam Railway Station, Mr. John Greenham.  Her death illness was
very brief, she being up and about apparently in her usual heath the evening
before.  The news of her demise was received with deep regret throughout the town
and vicinity, for the deceased was liked by all who knew her and a great
favourite with her immediate neighbors.  Her genial manner, kindliness of heart,
and other good traites won her respect and good wishes of all about her.   And
for her husband and family there is felt and evinced sincere sympathy in their
sad bereavement.

Interment took place at St. Mary's on the 9th, the Very Rev Dean Geddes
officiating at the graveside.

Caler (?) mourners George Greenham (husband of the deceased), Richard D.
Greenham, John Greenham, George Greenham (sons); Mary Greenham (daughter); William
Alworth, etc.

The coffin was overlaid with floral wreaths from the husband and children,
Miss M. E. Barnett, Mrs. W. Darling, Miss B. English, Mr. Henry Teskyy, etc.

The funeral which was large, and representative of all classes of the
community, included The Lord Bishop, Right Rev. Dr. O'Sullivan; E. J. Concanon, Dr.
Thompson, Henry Concanon, James (?) Huleatt, W. D. Darling, N.B.; Jasper
Starchan; Mr. Whitby, H. H. Wells, B.I.; George Pager, Henry Teskey, Mr. English, W.
Johnston, J. W. Black, Michael Warner, J. Leslie, R. Foster, E. Forster,
henry French, A. McCawley, T. Hayes, J. Noble, Very Rev. Canon Macken, Adm; James
McDonnell, C.T.O.; Francis Guy, Professor St. Jarlath's Patrick Murphy, T.C.,
D.C; M. C. Shine, T.C.; Francis Meagher, T. C.; John Connelly, T.C.; Patrick
Lyons, T.C.; James Daly, T.C.; M.C. Hosty, T.C.; Michael Goggins, T.C.; P.
Byrne, T. C.; Patrick Canavan, T.C.; F. Keane, T.C.; M.S. Walsh, P. M. Hosty,
Solr; Gerald Hosty, John glynn, Town Clerk, thomas Nolan, D.C.; Dr. Costello, P.E.
Carroll, T.O. Malley, Jas. J. Begley, Frank Dooley, Michael Loftus, Laurence
Burke, M. H. Macnamara, P. J. O'Flanagan, Postmaster; J.A. O'Flanagan, M.
Kilgarriff J.P.; P.M. Cahil, Michael Cahill, T. Sheey, P.S.C.; Mr. Murphy, N.B.;
P. McHugh, T. Waldron, P. McTigue, Michael Corcoran, Michael Nolan, T. Flatley,
Jas Cummins, M. Flannelly, Patrick Dunne, P. O'Brien, Jas Nohilly, P.J.
Lynch, T.J. Mellin, B. McHugh, John Whyte, P. Browne, James Ansbro, B. Jordan, T.
Hyland, Michael Farrell, E. Farrell, John Shine, T. Sloyan, John Corcoran,
Stephen Corcoran, P. Flannery, James Gannon, J. Keane, M. L. Keane, P. McGough, J.
Walsh, D. F. Butler (Naughton's) J. Lenter, Henry Kelly, J. Scanlon, P
O'Connor, T. hopkins, John Cahill, Michael Whyte, W. F. Fogarty, W. Jelly, J.
Nestor, M. Reilly, M. Cooley, W. Reapy, Mark Higgiston, W. Gormally, M. Dwyer, T.
Dwyer, John Mooney, A. McHugh, Robert Egan, M. J. Mannion, James Burke, A.
Kilgarriff, P.O.; J. Coogan, T. Owens, P O'Dea, M. Walsh, W. Shine, John Murphy,
Michael McGough, Dennis Grifey, P. Maloney, Railway Station; A. Mitchell, J.
McLoughlin, M. F. Mangan, P. Leeson, M. Joyce, T. Joyce, T. Brogan, J. Quinn, J.
Smith, G. Dillon, John Kelly, John Hancock, John Keane, Jas Heneghan, John
McGrath, Michael Flattery, John Hession, Jas Moran, M. Hamill, P. Hamilton, P.
Walsh, Gerald Smyth, John Flanagan, John Cunningham, Head Constable McPartlin,
Sergeant Coyne, Sergeant Cain, Constables Martyn, Gibbons, Murray, Padden,
Ashe, Barnes, O'Donnell, etc., etc.

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DEATH OF MR. THOMAS GREHAN, KILBANNON

Last week as recorded in this journal, passed away, to the deep and heartfelt
regret of a host of relatives and friends, an esteemed and well known
resident of Kilbannon, Mr. Thos. Grehan, at the patriarchal age of 98 years, during
which he had hardly ever suffered illness till feebleness from weight of years
set in.  The deceased was a fine specimen of an Irishman looked at from any
point of view.  He was upright, honest, and of independent mind, and an
unflinching nationalist.  He was a firm adherent of Parnell to the last, and while the
anniversary of his death was annually celebrated he seldom missed visiting
his grave; although he was then bordering on ninety.  Needless to say that the
deceased was popular and highly respected in the district.

Burial took place at Kilbannon on Thursday, 1st April.  Rev. Father Waters,
C.C., reciting the last prayers at the graveside.

Chief mourners - Darby Grehan (son); Mrs Kenny and Mrs Cunningham
(daughters); Ed Kenny, J. Kenny, and Thos. Grehan (grandsons); Michael Haddigan
(brother-in-law).

Amongst others at the funeral, which was large and representative, were -
Messrs. William Daly, Patrick Murphy, T.C., D.C.; C.G. Blake, Francis Keane,
T.C.; M. S. Walsh, D. Cummins, M. C. Shine, T.C.; John Connally, T.C.; M. I.
Corcoran, Daniel Corcoran, Michael Nolan, D.J. Butler (Naughton's), M.C. Hosty,
T.C.; P. Kilgarriff, James J. Begley, Michael Farrell, P. Browne, Martin
Corcoran, P. McHugh, P. Lyons, T.C.; James Glynn, J. McLoughlin, John Duffy, John
Hession, P. Duddy, T. Acton, J. Murphy, G. Herbert, Edward Lynskey, Martin
Higgins, Tom Donohoe, T. Concanon, T. Lally, T. Browne, T. Browne, P. Godwin, T.
Walsh, Michl. Lardner, Patrick Lardner, Patrick Connelly, D.C.; Thos. Varden, P.J.
Costello, D.C.; James Gormally, Pat Rabbitt, Thomas Keane, A. O'Connor, Thos.
Kelly, Patrick Hosty, Michael Walsh, Thos. McHugh, Michael Flanagan, Martin
Hughes, Walter Hughes, Thomas Crisham, Jas. O'Brien, Michael Mullin, Michael
Donnellan, P. Nestor, etc.

FUNERAL OF MISS TULLY.

Last week we announced with deep regret the death at Cambridge of Miss Anne
Christina Tully, youngest surviving daughter of the late Jeremiah Tully, Esq.
of Thornhill, and the Grove, Tuam, and Eyre Square, Galway, and granddaughter
of Martin Joseph Kirwan, Esq. of Curraghan, who, fortified by the rites of the
Catholic Church, breathed her last on last Monday week.

Miss Tully was born at Thornhill, afterwards called Kilcloghaus (?), near
this town, in 1852, and was in her 57th year.

The deceased lady was held in the highest esteem by all classes and creeds in
Cambridge, particularly among the Catholic community there, where her
charity, her desire to do good, and her unvarying kindness were most manifested and
best known.  At the funeral and at the graveside on Wednesday the attendance
showed the universal respect entertained for her in the town and by the members
of the University.

The remains were taken to the Catholic church on Tuesday night and lay there
before the High Altar all night with lighted candles around the coffin until
Wednesday morning, when Solemn High Mass de requiem was celebrated by Canon
Scott.

The funeral took place immediately after to the Mill Road cemetery, attended
by a numerous cortege.  The prayers at the graveside were said by the Rev
Andrew K____   Among those who attended or who sent wreaths were; -- Mrs. J. P.
Taylor (sister), Frank Leyburn Parker, George Tully Christie, B. L.; Mercyn (?)
Irvine (nephews); Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Whitbread, chief mourners; Mrs. E_______
Smith (?), Mrs. Johnson, Miss MacKenxie, Miss King, Mrs Baker Smith, Mrs.
Herbert Pigg, Mrs. Grinston, Mrs. Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. Hill, Mr. Rogers, Colonel
Sherlock, Mrs. Flanagan, Mrs. Hurrell, Mr. and Mrs. Woods, Miss Harris (Downing
College), Mr. and Mrs. Phipps (Clare College), Mrs. Chapman, Miss Speechley,
Mrs. Dickerson, Mrs. Hill, Mrs. Searle. The Misses Simmons, Mrs. Fromond, Mrs.
Hillard, etc.  Among those who sent letters or flowers are H.E.the Baroness
de Hugel, Mr. J. Image (Trinity), Miss Mackenzie (Newnharu ?? College), Mrs.
Whitbread, Mrs. Crampton, Mrs. Kennedy, Miss Schiller-Z_____, Miss ffrench. 

The coffin, which was covered with wreaths, bore the inscription : - "Anne
Christina Tully, Died April 5, 1909, Aged 57, R. I. P.

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SILVER WEDDING

HOGAN and LUPTON - April 19, 1884, at the Cathedral, Tuam, by his Grace the
Archbishop, assisted by the Rev. M. Heany, C A, James Francis Hogan, Inspector
of National Schools, younger son of the late James Hogan, Esq., Ballinacurra
House, Limerick, to Kate, widow of the late Robert Lupton, Esq., of Liverpool,
and daughter of Edmond Concanon, Esq, of Tuam.

----------

MARRIED

BLAKE and SYNOTT - April 15, 1909, at St. Joseph's, Glasthule, Francis
Joseph, son of Richard Blake, of Annaghdown House, Co Galway, to Edith Mary,
daughter of the late Thomas Synott, of Innismore, Glenageary, Co Dublin.

DONOHOE and FLANAGAN - On Thursday, the 15th April, 1909, at the Cathedral,
Tuam, by the Rev. O. Hannon, C.C., John Donohoe, Curracreen, Tuam, to Maggie,
daughter of the late William Flanagan, Bishop Street, Tuam.

----------

DIED

O'BEIRNE - April 17, 1909, at his residence, Tawin (?), Oranmore, Co Galway,
Patrick O'Beirne, aged 75; deeply regretted by his sorrowing wife and family.

----------

CONVENT OF MERCY, TUAM

On Saturday last, Miss Delia Flynn, daughter of Mr. William Flynn, May Grove
Cottage, Ballyhannis, received the holy habit of religion under the patronage
of St. John of God. His Grace the Archbishop offered the Holy Sacrifice at
7:30, giving holy communion to the young aspirant to the religious state.  The
ceremony of giving the white veil was performed at 8:30 by the Very Rev Canon
Macken, Adm, assisted by Rev Father McDermott, C.C.  Among the many friends who
attended the ceremony were Mr.and Mrs. Michael Flynn, Vincentian, and Rev. P.
Flynn, brother of the young religious.  Several other clerical are lay friends
witnessed the impressive and devotional ceremony.

----------

DEATH OF MR. RICHARD KELLY, ARDSKEABEG.

On Sunday last, after a lingering illness, departed to the deep regret of his
relatives and acquaintances, Mr. Richard Kelly, of Ardskeabeg, parish of
Cummer, in the 65th year of his age.  The deceased had lived a quiet life.  Always
of a retiring disposition, he meddled not in public affairs nor in anybody's
business but simply minded his own.  He was respected and esteemed, as evinced
by the large cortege attending the burial.

The remains were removed to the Parish Church Coreun (?), on Monday, and
there laid till next day when after Mass had been celebrated, the funeral left for
Kilmoylan, where the interment too place.

Chief mourners: Rev. R. Canavan, C.C., Westport; Rev. B. Canavan, C. C.,
Aughagower; Robert Canavan, Patrick Canavan, Edward Canavan, Francis Canavan, and
Stephen Canavan (nephews); Mrs. Ronaldson, (niece), John W. Ronaldson,
(nephew-in-law), Dominick Ronaldson.

The funeral included - Rev W. J. McHugh, P.P., Cummer, Rev Michael Diskin,
P.P., Milltown; Messrs. Martin Bodkin, J. P.; James McDonnell, C. T. C.; thomas
Browne, Patrick Rattery, Peter Hughes, James Nohilly, D.C.; Michael
Shaughnessy, James J. Burke, Thomas Mullin, H. Daly, Thomas Leacy (?), John Cunningham,
John Healy, J. Higgins, Michael O'Brien, John Stephens, M. C______, Martin
Shaughnessy, P. O'Donnell, N. T., Pat Hession, John Cunningham, F. Keane, T.C.;
John Connelly, T.C.; P. Lyons, T.C.; P Byrne, T.C.; D. O' Malley, P. McHugh,
P.E. Carroll, Thomas Nolan, MichaelCorcoran, Ml. Nolan, M. Farrell, Pat Farrell,
Edward Farrell, Daniel Butler, Bernard O'Connor, T. Hayden, M. O'Brien, Wm.
______, P. Cloonan, John McCabe, John Burke, Martin Murphy, D.C.; John Walsh,
Richard Walsh, M Roland, etc.

Rev. Richard Canavan officiated at the graveside, assisted by Rev. Father
McHugh. R.I.P.

----------

DEATH OF MR. MARTIN HEALY, CLOONSHEEN.

To the ineffable sorrow of his family and numerous friends died at his
residence on the 17th inst., Mr. Martin Healy, of Cloonsheen, parish of Kilconly,
after a brief illness, during which he had lay the consoling ministrations of
Holy Church at the hands of his attentive pastor, Rev. Father Lavelle.  The
deceased had attained the ripe old age of 79 years, during which he was invariably
hale and hearty and enjoyed his faculties unimpaired to the last.  The
interment took place at Kilconly on the 19th, and was attended by a large concourse
of people paying the last tribute and testifying by their presence to the
esteem and regard in which the deceased was held in the district.

Chief mourners - Winifred Healy, (wife), Thomas Healy, Andrew Healy, (sons);
Mrs. Walsh, Mrs. Thomas Healy (daughter-in-law); John Walsh, Patrick Walsh;
Maggie Walsh, Winifred Walsh (grandchildren); Mrs. Farrell (niece); John
Heverin, Thomas Heverin, Andrew Heverin (nephews).

Amongst others at the funeral were - Rev. M Lavelie, P.P, who officiated at
the graveside; Henry ffrench Lynch, J.J. Hughes, J. Farrell, Mrs. Blake, J.
Egan, Thomas Varrily, John Varrily, P. McTigue and T. Waldron, (McDonnell & Co.),
George E. Lynch, and M. Moran, etc.  R.I.P.


THE TUAM HERALD, Saturday, APRIL 24, 1909
TUAM, CO. GALWAY


PITHY PARS. - Personal Parochial Provincial and Particular

The "Heather Field," a clever play written by our county man, Edward Martyn,
Esq., of Tullyra Castle, Ardrahan, was produced last week at the Abbey
Theatre. Dublin. by the very talented troupe that appear on the boards of that most
popular place, not only of amusement but of instruction.  Every visitor from
the country should make it a point to go to the Abbey Theatre and see the
national plays there so well and faithfully produced..

---------

The appointment of Mr. John Blake Powell, the leading lawyer on the Connaught
Circuit, is not only a well won testimony to the high opinion held of him by
the Judges and fellow benchers, but one of the most unprecedented marks of
early recognition of ability and excellent professional qualities. There is no
man at the Irish Bar who won distinction earlier and who in so relatively short
a time after his call was made a Bencher.

----------

Mr. Feely, junr., Roscommon, was elected Sec. To the Suck Drainage Board in
room of the late Canon Burke-Wright, at the salary of 50 yearly, in Roscommon
last week.  Mr. Charles Bagot, Curraghmore, Atbleague, was also a candidate
for the position.

----------

We notice that a Liberal member for one of the Yorkshire constituencies is
Mr. Henry Fionis Blosse Lynch, who, although a native of London, is a son of
Thomas Kerr Lynch, described in "Who's Who" as "one of the Lynches of Partry
House, Co. Mayo."  Mr. Lynch has travelled much abroad, and in the House of
Commons interests himself in Colonial questions.

----------

The boxing match between "Chat" Beirne, the famous Roscommon pugilist, and
Bobby Dobbs, a coloured pugilist from Belfast, will take place in a marquee in
the Old Jail grounds, Carrick-on-Shannon, early in May.

----------

A serious encounter lately took place between two policemen, Constables Cuffe
and O'Brien of the Kilkerrin Station, Connemara, and a dangerous lunatic
named Pat Ridge.  It was reported at the police barrack that Ridge was in an
excited state, and being armed with a pitchfork and an iron bar, al his neighbours
had to seek refuge inside doors.  When the police came on scene, they found
Ridge as described, and when they made a step in his direction he charged at
them with the pitchfork, but avoiding the points of the weapon they rushed in on
the lunatic, and then followed a fierce struggle in which one of the
constables narrowly escaped being run through with the pitchfork.  After a considerable
time, however, the man was disarmed and conveyed by train to Galway, when
having been examined by Dr. Thomas McDonogh, before Mr. J. S. Young, J.P., and
Dr. Grealy, J.F., he was committed to Ballinasloe Lunatic Asylum.

----------

The Commission appointed by the Archbishop and Bishops of the Province of
Tuam to formulate a list of sacred music for exclusive use in public worship in
the churches of the Province held its first sitting in Sligo last week under
the chairmanship of the Most Rev. Dr. Clancy, Bishop of Elphin, and it was
arranged that a list of sacred music should be immediately drawn up and submitted
to each of the Diocesan Commissions with a view to securing its approbation
before it is finally published.  Resolutions regarding the fulfillment of the
Ecclesiastical Laws in reference to church music were unanimously adopted.

----------

In Galway, Burke's Posting Establishment, Eyre Square, was sold out by public
auction recently.  Though the day was extremely wet and unfavourable, there
was a crowded attendance at the sale, and buyers from various parts of the
county attended.  The sale was carried out by Mr. Mackle, of the firm of Joyce &
Mackie, Auctioneers and Valuers, Eyre Square, Galway.

----------

A wanton outrage was perpetrated on the premises of the Galway Granite and
Marble Co. at Earl's Island.  Two beautifully cut headstones were maliciously
cut in pieces.  One of them was of polished granite exquisitely carved, and the
other of native limestone.  The damage is stated to be about 30, for which
the Company have made a claim for compensation from the Urban District Council
at the next Quarter Sessions.

----------

We observe that Father Walter Conway, P.P., Glennamaddy, never content in
well doing, has now set himself to the task of erecting an Industrial Hall in the
town.  As a means to the end in view, he proposes to have a grand concert and
dramatic entertainment in St. Joseph's Schools on Sunday evening, April 25th.
 He has secured for the occasion a promise of rich vocal talent, and the
Ballybaunis amateur dramatic club are generously helping with a performance of a
most amusing sketch which runs by the title of "Blundering Barney," and in the
capable hands of the Ballyhaunnis amateurs will be seen to the fullest
advantage.  For social, recreative, and intellectual purposes the new hall, which is
to be named St. Brigid's Hall, will fill a useful place in the life of the
community, and often help to relieve the dulness and gloom of the long winter
nights.  Others might pause at attempting to carry such a project to completion,
but with Fr. Conway there is no such word as Fail, as the many monuments to
his zeal and perseverance, crowned by the splendid church he has given the
parish, so abundantly prove.

----------

To John Connell, District Councillor, Knockdos, a rather serious accident has
occurred.  It is stated he slipped on an orange peel on one of the pathways
while in Galway and sustained a severe wound on the head.  He was removed to
the County Infirmary, where for a time his condition was regarded as critical,
but accounts state that he is progressing favourably.

----------

Some of the residents of Corrib Terrace, Galway, were alarmed by cries for
help from the direction of what is known as the "Dam," one of the most dangerous
spots in Galway.  A young man named Murphy, who was staying for the night
with some friends, courageously went to the rescue and succeeded after much
difficulty in taking from the water a stranger who was completely exhausted, but
who declined to give his name.  For years past the Urban Council have been
writing to the Navigation Trustees about railing in or closing up this death-trap,
but without result.  It was stated at a meeting of the Council some time ago
that close on a 100 persons had been drowned in the dam.

----------

A marriage has been arranged, and will take place quietly at Ewhurst in
August, between Harold Winter Hodges, of the Royal Naval College, Dartmounth,
younger son of John C. Hodges, Plainmoor House, Torquay, and Maude Mary, elder
daughter of the late Rev J. T. Fowler, Canon of Tuam Cathedral, and Rector of East
Hanningfield, Essex, and Mrs. Fowler, Spange Hawe, Ewburst, Surrey, and
granddaughter of the late Lieutenant-General Law, K.H., Colonel 71st Highland Light
Infantry.

---------

The Westport Urban Council have adopted a water scheme for the town at a cost
of 8,500.  The work is now in hands.

---------

Archbishop Carr, of Melbourne, Australia, is seventy years of age.  He was
born in Galway in 1839; studied at Rome; at St. Jarlath's, Tuam, and at
Maynooth; ordained in 1865, six years parish work at Westport and Tuam; subsequently
Professor and Vice President at Maynooth; consecrated Bishop of Galway, 1883;
and Archbishop of Melbourne in 1886.

----------

Mr. Fetherstonbaugh, M.P., underwent, on the 3rd inst., and operation for the
relief of his throat, and is now rapidly convalescent.  The doctors think the
cure is sure to be permanent.  For a couple of months, however, he is to
avoid late hours, and get all the fresh air possible.

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